Assistant Professor of Higher Education

As a sociologist of education and qualitative researcher, Amy Stich is interested in issues of inequality of educational access, opportunity, and outcome relative to social class and race. Her current research, supported by a National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship, examines the structure and social consequences of postsecondary tracking.

Stich has published widely in academic journals including Sociology of EducationBritish Journal of Sociology of EducationAmerican Educational Research JournalUrban Education, and Review of Educational Research. She is the author of Access to Inequality: Reconsidering Class, Knowledge, and Capital in Higher Education  (Lexington Books) and the co-editor of The Working Classes and Higher Education: Inequality of Access, Opportunity, and Outcome (Routledge). Stich serves as a member of the Editorial Advisory Board of the British Journal of Sociology of Education.

Stich received her PhD in sociology of education from the University at Buffalo where she was also a postdoctoral research associate on a longitudinal ethnographic study of student transitions from high school to college, supported by the National Science Foundation. Prior to joining the Institute of Higher Education, Stich was an assistant professor in the Department of Leadership, Educational Psychology, and Foundations at Northern Illinois University.

Education:
  • Ph.D., Sociology of Education, University at Buffalo
Courses Regularly Taught:

Stich, A.E. (2018). Stratification with honors: A case study of the “high” track in higher education. Special Issue of Social Sciences (Guest Editors: Simon Marginson and Vikki Bolivar), 7(10), 1-17.

Stich, A.E. & Freie, C. (Eds.). (2016). The working classes and higher education: inequality of access, opportunity, and outcome. New York: Routledge.

Stich, A. (2012, 2014). Access to inequality: reconsidering class, knowledge, and capital in higher education. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.

Cipollone, K. & Stich, A.E. (2017). Shadow capital: the democratization of college preparatory education. Sociology of Education, 90(4), 333-354.

Stich, A.E. & Cipollone, K. (2017). In and through the urban educational ‘reform churn’: The illustrative power of qualitative longitudinal research. Urban Education.

Stich, A.E. & Reeves, T.D. (2016). Massive open online courses and underrepresented students’ access to higher education in the United States. The Internet and Higher Education, 32, 58-71.

Weis, L., Eisenhart, M., Cipollone, K, Stich, A., Nikischer, A., Hanson, J., Ohle, S., & Dominguez, R. (2015). In the guise of STEM education reform: opportunity structures and outcomes in inclusive STEM-focused high schools. American Educational Research Journal, 52(6),1024-1059.

Stich, A.E., & Colyar, J.E. (2013). Thinking relationally about studying ‘up.’ British Journal of Sociology of Education, 36(5), 729-746.

Research Interests:

Dr. Stich's primary interests of scholarly inquiry are in sociology of education, qualitative methodologies, sociology of higher education, and educational policy.

Friday, November 13, 2020 - 2:50pm

On November 6, the Institute welcomed back Angela Bell (PhD 2009) and Melissa Whatley (PhD 2019) for virtual presentations on the state of study abroad research and how these programs can survive the pandemic and emerge as agents for more equitable opportunities and o

Thursday, November 5, 2020 - 9:01am

Nolan Cabrera shared his experiences in higher education, particularly as he researched his book, White Guys on Campus, with members of the IHE community on Wednesday, November 3.

Monday, October 19, 2020 - 5:38pm
FACULTY PRESENT AT EAIR IN BUDAPEST
Wednesday, October 14, 2020 - 8:49am

Research on tracking systems in post-secondary education by Amy Stich appears in the Journal of Higher Education.

Monday, August 24, 2020 - 11:13am

Researchers in the UGA Institute of Higher Education were awarded $690,027 by the National Science Foundation to study how students’ access to experiential learning opportunities is affected by their proximity to areas with major economic and workforce activity.