Assistant Professor of Higher Education

Contact Info

706-542-2370

George Spencer conducts research on two related areas of inquiry: understanding students' educational pathways from high school through college, and evaluating the effectiveness of policy levers intended to improve college readiness, access, and completion. His work in these areas has been published in Research in Higher Education, Journal of Higher Education, and is forthcoming in the Review of Higher Education andTeachers College Record.

Professor Spencer's current research examines the extent of college transfer pathways and the impact of policies to support students in this effort. His other work examines interventions designed to prepare high school students for postsecondary success.

Previously, Professor Spencer was a Dean’s Faculty Fellow at NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development and a research associate at the Consortium on Financing Higher Education (COFHE). George was a 2015-2016 American Educational Research Association (AERA) Dissertation Fellow.

 

Education:

Ed.D. Education Policy, Leadership, Instruction, & Practice, Harvard Graduate School of Education 
Ed.M. Education Policy & Management, Harvard Graduate School of Education 
B.S. Communications Studies, Northwestern University
 

Courses Regularly Taught:

Events with George C. Spencer, Jr.

Monday, October 26, 2020 - 7:57am
Chronicle of Higher Education Power of the Professoriate
Friday, October 16, 2020 - 10:59am

George Spencer is quoted in "How 2- and 4-year colleges can boost spring enrollment" in EducationDive.

Thursday, December 19, 2019 - 4:10pm

A research paper by George C. Spencer, Jr. appears in The Review of Higher Education.

Thursday, October 31, 2019 - 1:54pm

George Spencer and Janine de Novais study the impact of Ethnic Studies courses on two distinct types of racial attitudes: structural racism perceptions and cross-racial empathy.

Tuesday, October 22, 2019 - 1:10pm
New faculty member George Spencer works to remove barriers for underrepresented students.